Category Archives: Babe Parilli

AFL Legend Babe Parilli Passes Away

Babe Parilli, a quarterback who had and excellent career in the AFL with the Raiders, Patriots and Jets, after playing his first five seasons in the NFL, passed away today at the age of 87.  The Patriots website posted an article on Parilli.

Former Patriots QB Vito ‘Babe’ Parilli Passed Away

Favorite AFL Images – Babe Parilli

oilers_pats_parilli

Here is another recent addition to my collections, and it comes from the same game as the Jim Hunt image that I featured last week.  I like this image for the depth of color and shadows, Babe Parilli’s positioning, and Ed Husmann (Oilers #82) leaping through the air.  Classic AFL.

Parilli is an interesting figure in AFL history, and one of the handful that played all 10 years of the league.  He was an original Raider, a member of the Eastern Division Champion Patriots in 1963, and backed up Joe Namath on the ’68 Jets.  Not bad, especially when you consider that he first broke into professional football in 1952, as a member of the Green Bay Packers. read more

November 28, 1965… I Remember the Patriots Beating the Jets 27-2

Guest blogger Bob Swick has been collecting football cards since 1965. He has written about football cards and memorabilia since 1990 for many sports collecting publications.  He is the Publisher and Editor of Gridiron Greats Magazine which can be found at http://www.gridirongreatsmagazine.com/

I was seven years old in 1965, and a big football fan.  I loved opening up wax packs of football cards, the NFL players found in the 1965 Philadelphia brand and my favorite 1965 Topps AFL players which were a larger card than the Philly’s and are known today as the “Tall Boys”. read more

NFL vs. AFL, or How I Learned to Recognize Fact from Fiction

by Guest Blogger, and author of Remember the AFL, Dave Steidel

MYTH: “AFL players were a bunch of ‘NFL Rejects’”. 

In the NFL they were known as “the Phoenix” players.  Rising from the ashes of one team only to be recreated and hit the highest of highs with another; players who had been put out to pasture or given up on because their time had passed.

One of those names could have been George Blanda, who after becoming the forgotten man in Chicago retired from pro football until he found new life and fame in the AFL by leading the Houston Oilers to three straight championship games including two AFL titles.  Then when Houston changed quarterbacks with a youth movement in 1967 he help defeat his former team in yet another AFL championship game as an Oakland Raider as the league’s leading scorer.  To the NFL media he was just a washed up quarterback trying to catch in a senseless new league. read more