Earl Faison & Curtis McClinton – 1963 AFL All-Star Game MVP’s

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All-Star Game MVPs

Earl Faison (86) and Curtis McClinton (32) receive their All-Star Game MVP Awards from Bob Breitbard.

On January 13, 1963, the AFL’s Eastern and Western Division All-Star Squads met on a chilly 49-degree afternoon in San Diego’s Balboa Stadium.  The squads, filled out with the best that the American Football League had to offer, fought to a 21-14 end, with the West winning their second consecutive all-star match.  The Most Valuable Player honors went to the Dallas Texans running back, Curtis McClinton, and San Diego Chargers defensive end, Earl Faison.

McClinton rushed eight times for 104 yards, an average of 13 yards-per-carry, the highlight of which was a 64-yard touchdown romp that opened the game’s scoring in the first quarter.  Said Western Division coach, Hank Stram, “We got off to a fast start on McClinton’s run, and we thought it was going to be a wild game, but the yardage was tough to get after that.”

Big #86, Earl Faison, led a Western Division defensive unit that held the opposition to just 143 net passing yards and 98 yards on the ground.  His relentless pass rush helped force Eastern quarterbacks into throwing five interceptions.  Said Eastern coach, Pop Ivy, “We were not blocking well, we couldn’t handle the Western line.  They’ve got a lot of big horses in there, and we failed to take advantage of our opportunities in the first half…  You take the best defensive linemen and backs, and there won’t be much scoring.”

The first and third AFL All-Star Game was also played in San Diego.  The remainder of the all-star games were moved to other stadiums across the country.

1963 AFL All-Star Game Ticket

Unused 1963 AFL All-Star Game Ticket signed by Defensive MVP Earl Faison.

 

Todd Tobias (789 Posts)

Todd Tobias's interest in the American Football League began in 1998, when he wrote my master's thesis about Sid Gillman. He created this site to educate and entertain football fans with the stories of the American Football League, 1960-1969. You can follow Todd and get more AFL history on Twitter @TalesfromtheAFL.



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2 Responses to Earl Faison & Curtis McClinton – 1963 AFL All-Star Game MVP’s

  1. Todd,
    What an awesome article buddy and even more fascinating, was your interview you did with one of my great buddies Steve Smith! (Steve was my neigbor and football team mate…He was one hell of a wide receiver for us at GH!! Interesting stuff, Todd, and man what a collection you have bro!!! Holy moly…As I told you, The NFL has been a huge part of my life since i was a baby…Mt brother Tommy, as you know played 8 years, and before that, my next door neighbor (Bob Petrich) played for Gilman and man oh man Todd did he tell some stories…George Gross was also a dear friend of ours, and back in 1986, I got to hang out with Bambi himself (Lance Alworth) at a 1960’s Chargers reunion!! I also have had Sunday Lunch and watch football for 6 hours with John Madden…His AFL day stories are amazing….This is really a cool site Todd as it was a golden age where men played football because they loved the game not the $$$$$$$$—–Teddy

  2. Todd Tobias says:

    Thanks, Teddy! I’m glad that you enjoyed it. Granite Hills had a bunch of AFL Chargers surrounding it. I ran into Pete Mikolajewski the other day, whose sons went to GH. In addition to Petrich and Gross, Sam Gruneisen’s kids went there, as did Walt Sweeney’s, I believe. All in your general era, too.

    I have been fortunate to spend a lot of time with Alworth and Gillman, but other than a cursory meeting, have never really spoken with John Madden. I’ll bet that was great! I find the late ’60s Raider to be a really interesting group.

    Thanks for the kind words, bud, and keep on reading!

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