Jim Hunt – From the 1965 Boston Patriots Team Yearbook

autographed 1967 topps jim hunt
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Jim Hunt 79

Originally played for Pop Ivy’s St. Louis Cardinals…  Left Cards one Friday afternoon in 1960 and reported to the Pats in Boston that evening at twenty to eight…  “When can you be ready?” the coach asked.  “When is the game?” replied the pride of Prairie View.  “In twenty minutes,” the coach answered.  “I will be ready when they kick the ball into the air,” said Jim…  Jim was ready and he played one of the finest games of his career that night…  dubbed “Earthquake” by Pats’ broadcaster Bob Gallagher, Jim is also called “Pickles”…  Strongest suit is ability to blitz passer…  Earthquake and Houston Antwine are affectionately known as the “Goldust Twins.”

Todd Tobias (789 Posts)

Todd Tobias's interest in the American Football League began in 1998, when he wrote my master's thesis about Sid Gillman. He created this site to educate and entertain football fans with the stories of the American Football League, 1960-1969. You can follow Todd and get more AFL history on Twitter @TalesfromtheAFL.



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4 Responses to Jim Hunt – From the 1965 Boston Patriots Team Yearbook

  1. Eddie Arminio says:

    Other front four’s in the AFL got more ink,but Antwine,Hunt,Dee, and Eisenhauer were the best.

  2. Win Perkins says:

    I used to watch the the Patriots practice at Curry College in Milton Massachusetts all the time when I was a kid. Many of the practices were open to the public. It is hard to imagine this happening today. One of my fondest memories is watching the Patriots come down to the practice field from the locker room in 1967, and seeing Jimmy Hunt riding on the back of a golf cart driven by an equipment manager, smoking a cigarette. I imagine he wasn’t running any marathons back then, but Jimmy Hunt could beat anybody in the American Football League from where he was, to the mailbox, and back again. And for a defensive tackle, that’s what really counts

  3. Tom says:

    Hunt was one of five players off his Prarie View team that played pro, Bo Farrington an emerging star receiver played for the Bears with the size and speed of Otis Taylor another Prarie View Alumnus. In 1965 Bo along with running back Willie Gallimore were killed in a car accident during training camp. Clem Daniels was a league leading rusher with the Raiders, Rufus Granderson and Dave Webster make five.
    In the years prior Prarie View produced only one NFL player Charlie Brackens, Brackens played only a single season 1955 with the Packers and was the third African American to play Quarterback in the modern NFL. Taliferro was first, followed by Willie Thrower. What sets Brackens apart is he was the first QB to play in the NFL from a traditionally black college, Taliferro played at Indiana and Thrower Michigan State.

  4. Charles Oakey says:

    Other great AFL front fours

    San Diego – Faison, Hudson, Ladd, and Nery.
    Buffalo – Day, Dunaway, McDole, and Sestak.
    Oakland – Birdwell, Davidson, Keating, and Lassiter.
    New York – Biggs, Elliott, Philbin, and Rochester.
    Denver – Costa, Duranko, Inman, and Jackson.
    Kansas City – Brown, Buchanan, Culp, and Mays.

    And critics said the AFL couldn’t play defense.

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